Using a noVNC branch to connect to your Supermicro iKVM

3 12 2016

Do you know how everyone just loves client side Java? Yeah, exactly. That’s why a lot of Nutanix customers will be quite happy with the IPMI firmware update for our latest systems. You will no longer have to rely on java to use the lights-out management, but you can simply use HTML5 to manage your systems.

Unfortunately, this update isn’t available to older systems. After cursing at Java again in my home lab, I decided to see if there was no way around it. Fortunately, I noticed that on GitHub, a developer called “kelleyk” posted a port of noVNC that adds support for ATEN iKVM, which is used in quite a couple of Supermicro servers.

So, after a bit of fiddling, I managed to get this to work on my Mac. First things first, download the fork from here:

Next up, make sure you have the xcode command line tools installed. If not, just run:

xcode-select --install

Also, since we will need a web socket bridge to forward requests to your IPMI interface (which encrypts traffic), make sure you have a certificate named self.pem, or generate one by issuing:

openssl req -new -x509 -days 365 -nodes -out self.pem -keyout self.pem

Once that is done, the rest is simple. Open a terminal and go to the directory where you copied the noVNC fork, and go to the “utils” directory. From there, run the shell script, and provide it with the IP-address of your IPMI interface and use the default VNC port as the port number:

./ --vnc

This will launch the script, and give you a link that you can open in your browser:

Using local websockify at ~/noVNC-bmc-support/utils/websockify/run
Starting webserver and WebSockets proxy on port 6080
WebSocket server settings:
 - Listen on :6080
 - Flash security policy server
 - Web server. Web root: /Users/basraayman/Downloads/noVNC-bmc-support
 - SSL/TLS support
 - proxying from :6080 to

Navigate to this URL:


Follow the link in your browser, leave the values as they are, and in the password field, input your IPMI username and password separated by a colon, so in the following format (note that ADMIN is both the default username and password in this case):



Once that is done, click the connect button, and you are now able to connect to the lights-out interface using your browser, no java needed. And while this might not be super ideal (no forwarding of iso images and such), it should make day to day administration a bit easier.


So, give it a whirl, and let me know if this works for you in the comments. 🙂



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